Technology Business & Management

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Overview

For an enterprise to succeed with a technology-based product or service, it must overcome technical challenges in design, implementation, and production. But it is not enough to overcome technical challenges at any cost. Rather, processes must make business sense. Furthermore, all aspects of an operation should work together smoothly.

The technology programs at Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology prepare students to assist engineers and other professionals with the technical aspects of a project. This program trains graduates to optimize and streamline business operations through more efficient project management, blueprinting project scope and determining workflow. Graduates of this degree have a solid understanding of both the technical operations and the business strategy of a company and can therefore, serve as the liaisons between the production floor and the boardroom. They assist with external and internal customer service, financial analysis of technical products, human resource management of technical staff, and marketing.

For example, a manufacturer of telecommunications equipment may need workers with knowledge of machining, programming, or troubleshooting. Graduates of BFIT’s programs in Mechanical, Computer Technology, or Electronics would be good choices to fill these roles. But engineers and managers at the same company might be looking at changes in the supply chain to improve the profitability of a unit. Support for those changes would require someone who understands the language of business. Likewise, work cells might be organized to reduce cost or improve turnaround time. Again, someone with knowledge of business and management practices would be more valuable in support of such changes than someone who only understands technological aspects of the work.

According to a recent report by the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, the highest paying jobs for individuals who have earned as associate degree are in business and manufacturing, the highest category within those fields is operations management, which requires a blending of business, management, and technical skill. These areas are also among the six with the greatest number of openings for middle skill jobs in the next seven years.