Course Descriptions

Eye Health Technology Department Course Descriptions
2012-2013 College Catalog

Course Name
Course Number
Credits
Description
Small Business Management   BS201  3 This course introduces students to the fundamental practices of small business management. Topics will include basic business planning principles, inventory management, sources of funding for small businesses and marketing strategies. Content will focus on the risks and opportunities in the Opticianry Field. (Offered in the fall)
College Composition I EN130  3 This course invites students to investigate the ways in which language is used in various settings. By examining how language is connected to issues of identity, students see the importance of using spoken and written communications appropriate to particular contexts. The course is structured around three main projects: a memoir where students explore their own experiences with language and identity, and two ethnographic studies where they look closely at two distinct communities, one informal and one professional, to see how people interact in those settings. The course calls for frequent informal written responses that build toward larger formal texts. Students are invited to become reflective of their writing processes as they are involved in a constant process of revising. They receive feedback from their instructor and classmates, and discuss many ideas and concepts in groups. (Offered in the fall, spring, and summer)
 
College Composition II  EN140  3 A continuation of College Composition I, this class considers many written genres while focusing on such issues as work, social class, culture, and identity. By examining these issues through the genres of journal articles, oral history, narrative, short story, poetry, drama, and film, students will build on their abilities to work reflectively, develop their responses, and incorporate the voices of others into their own texts through the use of quotations. Students will have the opportunity to write texts similar to the ones they are reading, as well as academic essays. Through the practice of close reading and expository writing, students will develop the ability to comment on not only specific genres, but also on the world around them. They will also have the opportunity to participate in the kinds of group and presentational work that might be practiced in a professional setting. Prerequisite: EN130 (Offered in the spring and summer)
HU/SS Electives    3  See General Education Course Descriptions
Technical Mathematics I MA105  3 This course is designed as an overview of the standard topics in Algebra as they apply
to technical applications. Practical examples of the math as it is used in the various technical fields are employed as much as possible. Topics covered include: linear equations, systems of linear equations, literal equations, slope, a review of fractions, metric units, scientific notation, and intermediate problem solving. Prerequisite: MA090 or Placement Exam (Offered in the fall, spring, and summer)
Optical Math  MA107  3 Optical Math provides the Opticianry student with an opportunity to become familiarized with mathematical concepts and formulae that are commonly used in ophthalmic science. The student will be introduced to optical formulae that contain mathematical concepts involving positive and negative integers, definition of infinity, algebra, trigonometry and approximations. In addition, students will learn how to solve complex optical formulae using a scientific calculator. (Offered in the spring)
 History Taking I & II  OA111 & OA131
 3/ 1
These courses provide instruction and practical experience in the proper methods and procedures in conducting a comprehensive case history of the patient prior to being examined by the ophthalmologist.Students learn aspects of taking a case history and proper recording of medical information as it relates to presenting complaint and history of illness, past ocular history, family history, systemic illness, medications, allergies & drug reactions and partially sighted patients (OA111 is offered in the fall and OA112 is offered in the spring)
Instrumentation I & II

 OA113 & OA133

 2/1 In these courses, students will learn how to use and care for all of the medical instruments that are used by ophthalmic assistants in evaluating the ocular health of a patient. Some of the instruments that are featured in the course curriculum include lensometer, keratometer, biomicroscope, phoropter, A-Scan biometer, ophthalmoscope, retinoscope and pupilometer. (OA113 is offered in the fall and OA123 is offered in the spring)
Medical Ethics, Legal & Regulatory  OA114  1 In this course, students will learn the legal, regulatory and medical ethical aspects as they relate to the ophthalmic profession. Among many of the topics presented are third party coding, government and institutional rules and regulations, quality assurance, ethical and legal standards, scribing, charting, confidentiality and informed consent. (Offered in the fall)
Medical Terminology and Knowledge I & II OA115 & OA125  3 In these courses, students will learn the medical terminology and depth of knowledge associated with being an ophthalmic assistant. Topics of ocular health that are presented in this course include anatomy, physiology, systemic diseases, ocular diseases, ocular emergencies and metric conversions. (OA115 is offered in the fall and OA125 is offered in the spring)
Professional Observation (8 to 16 hours, observation only)  OA116  1 In this course, students will be introduced to the many different aspects and working environments in which an ophthalmic assistant is employed. Students will be assigned
a minimum of 8 hours of clinical observation during the first semester. Students will present and share their clinical experiences, using a multi-media presentation at the conclusion of the course. (Offered in the fall)
Ophthalmic Patient Services & Education I & II  OA118 & OA128  3/1 In these courses, students will learn the many specific types of services and care techniques, whichSpecific topics which will be presented are patient education, surgery, systemic and ocular disease, anatomy and physiology; general & ocular, safety glasses, patient instruction, medication, tests, procedures, treatments, eye dressings, patient flow, triage, forms & manuals, legal forms for government services, vital signs, version and duction, function and anomalies, cover tests, stereoacuity, nystagmus and CPR training. (OA118 is offered in the fall and OA128 is offered in the spring) ophthalmic assistants provide for their patients. In addition, students will learn patient management systems and protocol in managing their patients.
Visual Fields and Assessment  OA119  1 In this course, students will learn how to conduct pre-testing for all forms of visual acuity and peripheral field analysis. Forms of acuity and peripheral field tests include adult and pediatric visual acuity, pinhole acuity, Amsler grid, confrontation fields and automated perimetry. (Offered in the fall)
Ophthalmic Skills OA129    1 This course will present a series of basic tests and procedures that are related to an overall analysis of the patient’s general ocular health. Tests which the students will learn to perform as a result of this course include spectacle skills (transpose cylinder readings), IOL power calculations, anterior chamber depth, pachymetry, calibration of biometry instruments, tear tests, glare testing, color vision testing, A-scan, laser interferometry and tonometry. (Offered in the spring)
Refractometry  OA130  2 In this course, students will learn the proper procedures and protocol in conducting a refraction of the eye. Topics presented in this course include basic optical theory, refractive error (automated), manifest refractometry and basic spectacle designs & dispensing. (Offered in the spring)
In-Office Surgical Procedures and Surgical Assisting OA132  1 In this course, students will learn the protocol and procedures that are related to assisting an ophthalmologist during in-office surgery. Types of surgical procedures, protocol and advanced technology that are presented as part of the course include instrument preparation, refractive, sterile fields, aeseptic technique, non-refractive laser therapy, intraocular injections, Yag laser, site identification and laser safety. (Offered in the spring)
Ocular Imaging   OA136  2 In this course, students will learn the art of ocular photography as a means to diagnose ocular abnormalities and diseases. Photographic ocular equipment that will be introduced to the student includes the slit lamp and anterior segment photography, fundus photography, external photography, A-scan, corneal topography and scanning laser tests for glaucoma and retinal diseases. (Offered in the spring) 
Ocular Pharmacology   OA137  1 This course offers students a comprehensive curriculum of ocular pharmacology. Students will learn how to identify ocular medications, instill medications, and educate the patient on medication and their drug-related reactions. (Offered in the spring)
Clinical Externship  OA140  2 (60-120 hours)
During the second semester, students in good academic and financial standing will be placed in a 60- to 120-hour externship, as part of the graduate requirements for the program. The one year certificate for Ophthalmic Assisting will be granted upon successful completion of the clinical assignment. (Offered in the spring)
Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye  OP105  3 This course is designed to give the opticianry student an insight into the anatomical structure of the eye and its adnexa. The student will also learn the function of the parts of the eye as they relate to vision, eyewear, and contact lenses. The learner will be presented with common pathologies of the eye and ocular pharmacology.
Ophthalmic Optics I  OP110  3 This course is a three-hour lecture course designed to include a brief history of glass and plastic, the various sphere, cylinder, and prism powers, review of the optical cross, flat and toric transposition, history and types of multifocals, and the lens aberrations. 
Principles and Practices in Opticianry I  OP115  3 The lab portion of this course will introduce the student to terms, instruments, equipment, lenses and materials to be used in the surfacing and finishing of ophthalmic prescription eyewear. Special emphasis will be placed on the procedures used to surface ophthalmic lenses including calculations, layout, blocking, generating, fining, polishing and inspection.
The clinical portion of this course will offer students an opportunity to gain real life exposure to the designing, fitting and dispensing of prescription eyewear in an optical business setting. The students will learn to operate an optical business, as well as the intricacy of quality patient care. The optical shoppe is open during the regular academic year and is operated by the students under the direct supervision of licensed opticians. The operating clinic offers students the opportunity to learn the practical aspects of opticianry through weekly presentations and assignments, as well as actual patient care.
Ophthalmic Optics II  OP120  3 This course is a lecture course designed as a continuation of Ophthalmic Optics I. It will include seg OC location, image jump, vertical imbalance using charts, correction of small amounts of vertical imbalance, sagital values, and center and edge thickness based upon vertex depth, specular images, and lens aberrations.
Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing Theory I  OP122  3 This course is a hybrid course in which a portion of the course (approximately 75%)
is offered as distance learning, and another portion meets physically on campus (approximately 25%). Ideally, students will engage in weekly distance learning sessions and assignments, a weekly on-campus lab for a practical quiz and/or assignment, and a monthly regular on-campus lecture session. This course is designed to introduce the student to the dispensing procedures. This course is designed to instruct the student in the process for ordering an Rx from the lab, the insertion and removal of lenses from frames and mountings, the alignment and adjustment of the frames and mountings for standard alignment and for the client’s face. The lab portion of the course is designed to introduce the student to the practical dispensing of optical products. Practical topics covered in the course include the neutralization of single vision and multifocal lenses for duplication of an Rx, measurement of frames and mountings, measurements of pupillary distance (PD’s), and the demonstration and calculation of the placement of multifocal segments. (Offered in the fall)
Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing Theory I Lab OP123   1 This course is a hybrid course in which a portion of the course (approximately 75%)
is offered as distance learning, and another portion meets physically on campus (approximately 25%). Ideally, students will engage in weekly distance learning sessions and assignments, a weekly on-campus lab for a practical quiz and/or assignment, and a monthly regular on-campus lecture session. This course is designed to introduce the student to the dispensing procedures. This course is designed to instruct the student in the process for ordering an Rx from the lab, the insertion and removal of lenses from frames and mountings, the alignment and adjustment of the frames and mountings for standard alignment and for the client’s face. The lab portion of the course is designed to introduce the student to the practical dispensing of optical products. Practical topics covered in the course include the neutralization of single vision and multifocal lenses for duplication of an Rx, measurement of frames and mountings, measurements of pupillary distance (PD’s), and the demonstration and calculation of the placement of multifocal segments. (Offered in the fall)
Principles and Practices in Opticianry II  OP125  3 This course will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and practice time to develop skills in the fabrication of single vision eyewear. It will include surfacing procedures, the use of the lensometer for verification and the layout of single vision lenses for edging. Blocking, automatic edging, hand beveling, lens tempering, lens insertion, pattern making, and machinery maintenance will also be covered. The clinical portion of this course will offer students an opportunity to gain real life exposure to the designing, fitting and dispensing of prescription eyewear in an optical business setting. The students will learn to operate an optical business, as well as the intricacy of quality patient care. The optical shoppe is open during the regular academic year and is operated by the students under the direct supervision of licensed opticians. The operating clinic offers students the opportunity to learn the practical aspects of opticianry through weekly presentations and assignments, as well as actual patient care.
Low Vision Dispensing OP128    2 Students will explore the most common forms of vision loss and their cause. In addition, students will develop first-hand experience as to vision impairment through the use of vision impairment simulators and exercises. Students will also learn proper conduct and professional guidance as a sighted guide for the visually impaired.
Contact Lens Theory I  OP230  3 This course is designed as a basic introduction to the fitting of rigid and soft contact lenses. It will include terminology, instrumentation for the fitting of contact lenses, the development and history of lenses, patient selection, and the assessment of the fit.
Contact Lens Theory I Lab  OP231  1 The lab portion of the course is designed to introduce the student to the handling of contact lens materials and the operation and maintenance of instruments used in the fitting and designing of contact lenses. Primary instruments that students will be operating include a keratometer, measuring loupes, lensmeter, phoptor, biomicroscope, radiuscope, and corneal topographer.
Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing II  OP232  3 This course is a hybrid course in which a portion of the course (approximately 75%) is offered as distance learning, and another portion meets physically on campus (approximately 25%). Ideally, student will engage in weekly distance learning sessions and assignments, a weekly on-campus lab for a practical quiz and/or assignment, and a monthly regular on-campus lecture session. The course is designed to further explore topics learned in Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing I and Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing Lab I. Students will review frame alignment and adjustments, techniques for fitting multifocals, and lens identification. The course will expand into troubleshooting of visual problems, repairing of frames, applying safety standards in the optical workplace and lifestyle dispensing. Students will become familiar with progressive lenses, lens options / coatings, and the techniques for ordering lenses, frames and optical supplies. 
Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing II Lab  OP233  1 The lab portion of the course is designed to further explore topics learned in Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing I and Ophthalmic Design & Dispensing II. Students will review frame alignment and adjustments, techniques for fitting multifocals, and lens identification. The course will expand into troubleshooting of visual problems, repairing of frames, applying safety standards in the optical workplace and lifestyle dispensing. Students will become familiar with progressive lenses, lens options / coatings, and the techniques for ordering lenses, frames and optical supplies. (Offered in the spring)
Principles and Practices in Opticianry III  OP235  3 In this progression course, students will be able to hone and perfect the lab finishing skills in the fabrication of prescription eye wear. Students will learn the advances in spectacle finishing and manufacturing. Students will be expected to complete lab assignments which contain multiple jobs of varying levels of difficulty within a timed period. Students will also learn to work as a team as the finishing lab is turned into a wholesale production facility. The clinical portion of this course will offer students an opportunity to gain real life exposure to the designing, fitting and dispensing of prescription eyewear in an optical business setting. The students will learn to operate an optical business, as well as the intricacy of quality patient care. The optical shoppe is open during the regular academic year and is operated by the students under the direct supervision of licensed opticians. The operating clinic offers students the opportunity to learn the practical aspects of opticianry through weekly presentations and assignments, as well as actual patient care.
Contact Lens Theory II OP240    3 This course is a continuation of Contact Lens Theory I, emphasizing contact lens verification, dispensing, and follow-up care. The fitting of astigmatic, presbyopic, and special needs patients will also be covered. The lab portion of the course is a continuation of Contact Lens Lab I emphasizing contact lens verification, dispensing, and follow-up care. The fitting of astigmatic, presbyopic, and special needs patients will also be covered.
Contact Lens Theory II Lab  OP141  1 The lab portion of the course is designed to introduce advanced levels of clinical instrumentation and their use in determining the proper contact lens fit on the eye. Student will also be able to refine and hone their expertise in the handling of contact lens materials and the operation and maintenance of instruments used in the fitting and designing of contact lenses. Primary instruments that students will be operating include a keratometer, measuring loupes, lensmeter, phoptor, biomicroscope, radiuscope, and corneal topographer.
Principles and Practices in Opticianry IV  OP243  3 This course is designed to educate students in the technical skills of performing various procedures within the ophthalmic visual assessment area of a dispensary. The course will present technical equipment procedures, maintenance and use, as well as the skills needed in assisting Optometrists and patients with various procedures such as administering medicines and pharmacology identification and uses. The clinical portion of this course will offer students an opportunity to gain real life exposure to the designing, fitting and dispensing of prescription eyewear in an optical business setting. The students will learn to operate an optical business, as well as the intricacy of quality patient care. The optical shoppe is open during the regular academic year and is operated by the students under the direct supervision of licensed opticians. The operating clinic offers students the opportunity to learn the practical aspects of opticianry through weekly presentations and assignments, as well as actual patient care.
Vision Assessment  OP245  3 This course is designed to instruct the student in the theories behind the various tests given during a routine refraction. Topics include anatomy and physiology of the eye (review), mechanics of ametropias, epidemiology and etiology of refractive errors. Trends in visual acuity and accommodative/convergence relationships in the myopic, hyperopic and presbyopic eye will be discussed. Also included will be problems in binocular vision and retinoscopy.
Opticianry Technical Skills and Service Lab 1  OP281  1 The topics of this course are designed to introduce the opticianry student to current and relevant issues related to public health and aspects of clinical care. Students will develop an awareness and identify areas of the community that are in need of optical care. The course presents students with the tangible opportunity to learn from community involvement and helping to engage and address areas of social, ethical, economic and policy-limiting concerns within our own environment. Students will engage in several aspects of service learning projects and professional inter-disciplinary presentations. Clinical patient care offers students an opportunity to rotate among a variety of opticianry businesses. Students will begin to gain real life exposure to the opticianry industry, which will ultimately allow them to better understand client service and management, as well as allow them to explore different career paths. Assigned research and professional presentation projects offer students an opportunity to explore optical health issues related to eye health and their many possible developing solutions based upon advanced ocular health procedures and treatments. Assigned projects may also include collaborative research and presentation with students from optometry in order to promote inter-disciplinary professional problem solving and eye care that is routinely practiced throughout the profession. The course is designed to fully support the College mission of community service learning. Students will be evaluated on the successful completion of two projects: a community based service learning project where students engage in providing clinical care to a worthwhile organization event, project or population. The poster project is an education awareness campaign designed to educate the public as to a particular segment of “Healthy Sight For Life”. The project will be presented and displayed at the end of the academic year at a college wide vision health fair as a poster session. Presentations are judged in a competitive format during the Vision Health fair by optical experts representing the profession.
Opticianry Technical Skills and Service Lab 2  OP282  1 The topics of this course are designed to introduce the opticianry student to current and relevant issues related to public health and aspects of clinical care. Students will develop an awareness and identify areas of the community that are in need of optical care. The course presents students with the tangible opportunity to learn from community involvement and helping to engage and address areas of social, ethical, economic and policy-limiting concerns within our own environment. Students will engage in several aspects of service learning projects and professional inter-disciplinary presentations. Clinical patient care offers students an opportunity to rotate among a variety of opticianry businesses. Students will begin to gain real life exposure to the opticianry industry, which will ultimately allow them to better understand client service and management, as well as allow them to explore different career paths. Assigned research and professional presentation projects offer students an opportunity to explore optical health issues related to eye health and their many possible developing solutions based upon advanced ocular health procedures and treatments. Assigned projects may also include collaborative research and presentation with students from optometry in order to promote inter-disciplinary professional problem solving and eye care that is routinely practiced throughout the profession. The course is designed to fully support the College mission of community service learning. Students will be evaluated on the successful completion of two projects: a community based service learning project where students engage in providing clinical care to a worthwhile organization event, project or population. The poster project is an education awareness campaign designed to educate the public as to a particular segment of “Healthy Sight For Life”. The project will be presented and displayed at the end of the academic year at a college wide vision health fair as a poster session. Presentations are judged in a competitive format during the Vision Health fair by optical experts representing the profession.