Course Descriptions

Building Technology Department Course Descriptions
2014-2015 College Catalog

 Course Name
Course #
 Credits Description
Building Construction Graphics   BT100  4 The fundamental principles of building construction graphics are presented in weekly lectures and are developed in the studio through a wide variety of assignments and a semester long project both focusing on developing basic drafting and drawing skills. Emphasis is placed on reading, interpreting, and understanding construction drawings for various buildings.
Students will learn foundation concepts including: measurement and scale, the creation of architectural drawings - plans, sections, elevations, using orthographic projection, geometric constructions, isometrics, and creation of existing condition drawings through measurement and drafting. Other topics include an introduction to various national standards and regulations, use of graphic symbols and abbreviations, schedules, dimensioning, typical sheet sizes, proper sheet (page) layout, sheet arrangement, sheet sequence (set), and drawing relationships on a sheet.
Students will be taught critical and practical skills related across disciplines of building design and construction and how these skills apply to and are used in a work environment. Topics include the proper use of hand drafting tools and materials, developing
distinctive line weights and using line types, lead selection / hardness, freehand sketching with various pens and pencils, the use of trace as a design and drafting tool, lettering, how to erase and modify drawings, how to keep drawings clean while working on and transporting, storage and general organization of tools and materials. Additional topics include the use and care of office machines, printers, copiers, scanners and how to create a digital portfolio using www.issuu.com (Offered in the fall and spring).
Introduction to CAD  BT110  3 Through lectures and hands-on laboratory sessions students will be introduced to the use of computers for the production of drawings. Students will learn to create architectural drawings similar to those produced in an architectural office, using industry standards such as AutoCAD and National CAD Standard v5. CAD skills will include basic drawing, modifying and editing commands, and proper techniques for final presentation drawings. Students will learn these skills through the development of a project from plans to a 3d model. At course end, students take a simulated AutoCAD assessment exam in order to demonstrate their proficiency in AutoCAD (Offered in the fall and spring).
AutoCad for Electrical Applications  BT115  3 Through lectures and hands-on laboratory sessions students will be introduced to Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD), including overview of computer hardware, Windows operating systems, and the AutoCAD software application program. Competence in utilizing the AutoCAD program to construct drawings is realized through progressive use of AutoCAD commands and procedures obtained by the student’s construction of various projects and exercises relating to architectural and electrical fields. Develop an understanding of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and its use as a tool in coordinating the design and construction of buildings and building systems with a primary focus on electrical systems (Offered in the spring).
Introduction to World Architecture  BT140  3 Through lectures, written assignments and analysis, students will develop an understanding of the driving social, environmental, material, and technological forces in world architecture from prehistory to post-modernism. They will improve their skills of visual analysis and visual literacy, understand basic architectural typologies from varied cultures, and develop their ability to write and think critically. The course will focus on the Western tradition of architecture, which includes Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, Europe, Islamic North Africa, and Spain; but will also include cultures of China, Japan, and North and South America. The course is intended to bring the students to a historical awareness such that the student sees how the influence of historic precedent is all around them in their own built environment (Offered in the fall and summer).

Introduction to Adobe Design Standard  BT145  3 The course will introduce students to a suite of Adobe software that is used in creating presentations in the architecture, engineering and construction fields (AEC). Students will be introduced to the basics of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Acrobat and Bridge CS. Lectures will instruct students on the use of the programs and how they are used together to create presentations for digital publication. Lab assignments will focus on the use of each program and then how they are used in an integrative manner to enhance the work done in the programs to create various presentation materials. Students will use the skills learned and apply them throughout the remaining semesters (Offered in the fall and spring).
Building Design I  BT150  4 Students will be introduced to the fundamental theories and principles of building design and construction. Both two and three-dimensional design problems and puzzles will be assigned throughout the semester. Students will develop critical thinking, and an ability to talk about and evaluate design both objectively and subjectively, understanding the difference between a puzzle and a problem.
Students will learn tactics for solving problems and presenting solutions as a design professional would: by analyzing, diagramming, programming, creating a storyboard and developing a final presentation. Drawing (both by hand and CAD) and model making skills will be improved and refined. Students will study examples from history. Design principles such as symmetry, hierarchy, repetition, proportion and scale will be reinforced by design problems. Further discussion and problem solving will integrate functional and objective areas such as: environmental building factors of sun, wind, light and sound. Students will understand the use of and apply construction regulations, specifications and standards such as CSI MasterFormat, Project Delivery, ADA accessibility, building codes, zoning regulations, and LEED. Prerequisite: A GPA of 2.0 in BT100 or a waiver from the department chair (Offered in the spring and summer).

Building Materials and Applications  BT160  4 Building Materials and Applications is a comprehensive study of building construction technology, which includes various building systems, the construction process and the materials used in those systems and processes. The study of the methods and techniques of material extraction, manufacturing assembly and installation are covered in depth. Students will learn about specific material’s properties, characteristics, and their combinations to form composite elements. Construction regulations and standards including building codes, zoning regulations, and ADA accessibility are studied. The construction process is examined including the roles of professionals such as regulatory agencies, the design team, the construction team, financing agencies, the owner, and the user. Professional industry entities dealing with building specifications such as the CSI (construction specifications institute), their composition and organizational components such as Masterformat and Project Delivery are covered as well as green rating systems such as LEED (leadership in energy and environmental design) for new construction. The course also provides an overview of building
structural design.Students will develop several semester projects that tie directly to lectures and offer practical application of textbook material. Each project will focus on basic building materials such as wood, concrete, masonry, and steel construction. Students will design and draft simple construction documents with attention on construction details for different assemblies (Offered in the spring).
Construction Document Technologies  BT200  4 This course develops the graphic skills and technical knowledge that are needed to communicate essential, detailed information to clients, builders/contractors, and consulting engineers. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of a set of construction drawings for a single-family residence, using AutoCAD and Revit software. The methods and techniques of light wood frame construction in residential and commercial buildings are explored in depth. Sample specifications are studied and prepared by each student. Energy efficiency as required by codes and sustainable and green building practices will be emphasized in the development of the construction documents. Students will understand the purpose of contract drawings as a means of communicating design ideas to a builder/contractor and to expand and strengthen the student’s skills in the fundamental methods and techniques of light wood frame construction. Also covered is the CSI Project Delivery Practice Guide as the basis of practice in building design, construction and facility operation and maintenance. Students will take a simulated assessment exam for Certified Document Technologist to demonstrate their understanding of the industry standard manual of practice. Prerequisites: A GPA of 2.0 in BT260 or a waiver from the department chair (Offered in the spring).
 BIM I  BT210  4 Introduction of the use of 3D modeling and building information modeling software (BIM) for the preparation of drawings is presented through lectures and hands-on laboratory sessions. In the introduction of the course, students will use Google SketchUp Pro 3D modeling software. Basic modeling, modifying and editing commands are utilized to complete and save various 3D modeling projects to develop a basic understanding of SketchUp as a tool in creating drawings renderings. The remainder of the course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of BIM (Building Information Modeling) through the use of Revit Architecture, Autodesk's BIM software platform. Students will become familiar with the fundamental tools of Revit Architecture and parametric modeling including: user interface, parameters, families, components, massing, rendering, and printing. Basic modeling, modifying and editing commands are utilized to complete and save various modeling projects to develop a basic understanding of Revit as a tool in creating drawings. Students will integrate their projects from other technology courses to produce computer models of those projects in both SketchUp and Revit. Prerequisite: A GPA of 2.0 in BT110 or a waiver from the department chair (Offered in the fall).

Sustainable Buildings: Design & Construction  BT220  3 Overview of the concept of sustainability (holistic living and building design that integrates solar concepts, energy efficiency, and material ecology) and its economic, political, and environmental consequences. Lecture and hands-on application focus on sustainable building practices, including design, specification, construction, lifecycle issues, LEED certification and other organizations. Exploration of the historical basis for the ideology of sustainability, its applications in today's society (Offered in the fall).
Environmental Systems  BT250  4 The study of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing and electrical systems for facilities both residential and commercial is taught. Students will learn to understand the basic design and construction terminologies used to be able to read and create HVAC, plumbing and electrical construction documents. Also included is the presentation of the basic principles found in vertical circulation, security, fire protection, noise control and room acoustics, energy sources, and green building design considerations. Field trips to area construction and building sites augment class studies (Offered in the spring).
Building Design II  BT260  4 Using graphic diagrams as a means of testing ideas, students will explore various spatial organizations and circulation patterns to develop a concept diagram. The concept is then further developed into schematic design drawings; floor plans, elevations and isometric drawings, through sketching and hand drafting. Students will then create design development documents using AutoCAD software. The selection of materials and technologies appropriate to the student’s project is developed individually in the studio. Students will be assigned a program for a single-family residence following it through the successive stages of design. Initially, students will analyze the environmental factors influencing the design such as: cultural/historical, legal/economic and climatic. Each student will then develop their design based on the analysis and on user/owner requirements. Prerequisite: A GPA of 2.0 in BT150 or a waiver from the department chair (Offered in the fall).
 BIM II  BT270  4 This course extends the content from BT210 BIM course, covering BIM in more detail through the use of Revit Architecture. Students will expand their knowledge of the tools of Revit Architecture and parametric modeling. Concepts to be studied include: user generated custom families, flexing parameters, rendering with custom materials, work sharing, detailing and documentation. Students will also use Revit Architecture in conjunction with their work in BT260 and use the software to produce a set of construction drawings. Students will also be exposed the use of Revit Structure, Revit MEP and Ecotect Analysis software. At course end, students take a simulated Revit assessment exam in order to demonstrate their proficiency in Revit Architecture. Prerequisite: A GPA of 2.0 in BT110 and BT210 or a waiver from the department chair (Offered in the spring).

Statics and Strength of Materials  BT280  4 Introduction to the basic fundamentals of statics and strength of materials relating to structural components of a building or structure. The principles of static equilibrium and free-body diagrams are applied to basic building structural elements and simple structural systems commonly found in buildings. The principles of stress, strain, and material properties are studied as they relate to materials commonly used in the building industry. Bending, shear, and deflections and associated stresses are investigated and used as design requirements. Prerequisite: MA120 and PH212 (Offered in the spring).
Building Construction Graphics CM100  3 Fundamental principles of Building Construction Graphics are presented in weekly lectures and are developed in the lab through a wide variety of assignments and a semester long project. Emphasis is placed on the core competencies of graphic communication for the built environment, how design professionals communicate ideas, from inception through construction. Students will learn foundation concepts including: measurement and scale and the reading of and interpretation of architectural drawings - plans, sections, elevations. Other topics include an explanation of graphic symbols and abbreviations, dimensioning, typical US sheet sizes, proper sheet (page) layout, sheet arrangement, sheet sequence (set), and drawing relationships on a sheet. Students will begin to understand and apply construction regulations, specifications and standards such as CSI Masterformat, Project delivery, ADA accessibility, building codes, zoning regulations, and LEED.
Construction Management I  CM110  3 This course offers a sampler of the entire CM program. It provides the first introduction to the principles of management, construction industry, roles and responsibilities, and an overview of common project management tools. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to understand terminology common to the construction industry, general principles of management and the roles and responsibilities of parties. Students will be familiar with selected planning and control tools and common safety concerns and protocol.
Construction Estimating  CM130  3 This course introduces students to the skills and tools necessary to prepare cost estimates for construction projects. The course focuses on the blueprint reading  and determination of quantities (materials takeoff). Classes will include lectures, problems, examples and a term project. This course aims to increase and improve the working knowledge of students in construction estimating and to train them as professional construction managers. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to read blueprints, perform quantity takeoff for various work items. Utilize computer software to prepare required deliverables. Perform quantity take offs and pricing for a small construction project. Emphasis shall be placed on the scope of work, coordination and quantity surveys for the building components for residential and commercial projects.
Heavy Construction CM145  3 This course introduces students to construction equipment and selected construction methods. This includes economy, selection, and productivity of common construction equipment and construction procedures for industrial and heavy civil construction. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to understand terminology and units of measurements related to equipment usage in industrial and heavy civil projects. Understand standard designations, sizes, and graduations of equipment and perform comparative cost analysis for owning and operating heavy equipment. Perform the proper selection, applications, utilization and productivity of heavy equipment and understand general processes/methods for constructing industrial and heavy civil projects. Show awareness of construction Safety (OSHA regulations for excavation, inspection and protection).
Construction Management II CM210  3 A management course in contract documents, safety, planning, scheduling, production control, and law and labor. Topics include contracts, planning, cost and production peripheral documents, and cost and work analysis. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to explain construction contract documents, planning and scheduling, cost and production controls. Describe laws and labor issues related to construction projects. Demonstrate the ability to plan and schedule a construction project. Implement job site safety practices and procedures. Identify use of tools and equipment along with method of use in construction and perform common procedures at the job site. Describe and recognize requirements in construction documents. Describe terms and methods in techniques for planning, scheduling and supervision and identify laws and labor issues in construction. Demonstrate problem solving techniques and dexterity in planning and scheduling projects.
Construction Surveying  CM250  4 The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the fundamental understanding of land surveying, including both the theory of surveying as well as the hands-on use of modern surveying instruments. Specifically, the theory portion of the course includes surveying computations of: grade, direction, traverse adjustment, area, volume, and horizontal & vertical curve geometry. The instrumentation portion of the course includes making field measurements of elevation, distance and angle using the appropriate land surveying equipment including: the tape, engineer’s level, transit, theodolite, EDMI, and total station. An introduction to construction layout is also included. Upon successful course completion, students will understand the use of measuring systems and the proper mathematical calculations to produce accurate and correct true distances and the use of a level and the mathematical calculations to determine elevation differences. Understand the use of a transit to determine vertical and horizontal angles to locate reference points as applied to construction staking and surveying. Students will have an improved understanding of the rule on Construction Surveying and layout in the operation of the construction industry.
Project Scheduling CM260  3 This course introduces students to the theory and application of the fundamentals of construction planning and scheduling to include creating, presenting, revising, and updating construction schedules. This course will help enhance students’ ability to understand and apply management principles and practices including: process planning, directing, costing, resource allocation, and controlling all aspects of the construction operations and resources from pre-construction through project close out. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to understand and apply network scheduling methods to construction projects and prepare WBS (work breakdown structures). Perform cost and budget analysis and calculate schedule and cost variance for projects. Use commercial scheduling software and perform resource allocation & leveling. Update schedules and monitor work progress using the schedule and other tools/programs in managing a construction project.